Slava Novorossiya

Slava Novorossiya

Saturday, January 21, 2017

THE BATON ROUGE SERIAL KILLER: DERRICK TODD LEE (NOVEMBER 5, 1968 TO JANUARY 21, 2016)



On this date, January 21, 2016, the Baton Rouge Serial Killer, Derrick Todd Lee died of heart disease at a hospital in Louisiana, where he was transported for treatment from Louisiana State Penitentiary, where he had been awaiting execution.. I will post the information about this serial killer from Wikipedia and other links.

Derrick Todd Lee
Derrick Todd Lee (Mugshot)


Born
Derrick Todd Lee
November 5, 1968
St. Francisville, Louisiana, U.S.
Died
January 21, 2016 (aged 47)
Lane Regional Medical Center, Zachary, Louisiana, U.S.
Cause of death
Other names
The Baton Rouge Serial Killer
Criminal penalty

Killings
Victims
7+
Span of killings
August 23, 1992–March 3, 2003
Country
US
State(s)
Date apprehended
May 27, 2003

Derrick Todd Lee (November 5, 1968 – January 21, 2016), also known as the Baton Rouge Serial Killer, was an American serial killer. His killing spree began in 1992 and ended in 2003, and consisted of seven women.
Prior to his murder charges, he had been arrested for stalking women and watching them in their homes. Lee was initially overlooked by police, because they incorrectly believed the killer was white. Lee was linked by DNA to the deaths of seven women in the Baton Rouge and Lafayette areas in Louisiana, and in 2004 was convicted, in separate trials, of the murders of Geralyn DeSoto and Charlotte Murray Pace. The Pace trial resulted in a death sentence.
Newspapers suggested Lee was responsible for other unsolved murders in the area, but the police lacked DNA evidence to prove these connections. After Lee's arrest, it was discovered that another serial killer, Sean Vincent Gillis, was operating in the Baton Rouge area during the same time as Lee.
Lee died on January 21, 2016, of heart disease at a hospital in Louisiana, where he was transported for treatment from Louisiana State Penitentiary, where he had been awaiting execution.

OTHER LINKS:


Friday, January 20, 2017

THE WANNSEE CONFERENCE (JANUARY 20, 1942)



            On this date, January 20, 1942, at the Wannsee Conference held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee, senior Nazi German officials discuss the implementation of the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question". 

 
 The 15 Attendees of the Wannsee Conference
The Wannsee Conference (German: Wannseekonferenz) was a meeting of senior officials of Nazi Germany, held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942. The purpose of the conference, called by director of the SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office; RSHA) SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, was to ensure the cooperation of administrative leaders of various government departments in the implementation of the final solution to the Jewish question, whereby most of the Jews of German-occupied Europe would be deported to Poland and murdered. Conference attendees included representatives from several government ministries, including state secretaries from the Foreign Office, the justice, interior, and state ministries, and representatives from the Schutzstaffel (SS). In the course of the meeting, Heydrich outlined how European Jews would be rounded up from west to east and sent to extermination camps in the General Government (the occupied part of Poland), where they would be killed.
Legalized discrimination against Jews began immediately after the Nazi seizure of power on 30 January 1933. Violence and economic pressure were used by the Nazi regime to encourage Jews to voluntarily leave the country. After the invasion of Poland in September 1939, the extermination of European Jewry began, and the killings continued and accelerated after the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941. On 31 July 1941 Hermann Göring gave written authorization to Heydrich to prepare and submit a plan for a "total solution of the Jewish question" in territories under German control and to coordinate the participation of all involved government organisations. At the Wannsee Conference, Heydrich emphasised that once the deportation process was complete, the exterminations would become an internal matter under the purview of the SS. A secondary goal was to arrive at a definition of who was Jewish and thus determine the scope of the exterminations.
One copy of the Wannsee Protocol, the circulated minutes of the meeting, survived the war to be found by Robert Kempner, lead U.S. prosecutor before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, in files that had been seized from the German Foreign Office. The Wannsee House, site of the conference, is now a Holocaust Memorial.